Tag Archives: URS

Retrospective

Don’t look back. Something might be gaining on you…Satchel Paige

Looking back is a luxury that we can rarely afford. Fermata is a consultancy; we live from contract to contract. The good news is that we stay busy. The bad news is that we rarely get the opportunity to look back over our accomplishments.

Monument Rocks, Kansas, by Ted Lee Eubanks
With the year’s end approaching, perhaps we should take the time to consider our work. For example, I am currently helping Kansas develop an ecotourism strategy. Governor Brownback and Kansas Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KWPT) Secretary Robin Jennison brought me into the project to facilitate the development of the strategy. This coincides with our work on interpretive plans for the 11 Kansas byways, as well as the writing of an interpretive plan for the state byways as a whole.

Ted’s San Antonio River Photo To Be Used In Witte Museum Exhibit

San Antonio River by Ted Lee Eubanks
The Witte Museum is one of San Antonio’s premiere museums hosting and producing history and science exhibits for the community. Over 400,000 people visit the Witte Museum annually. The museum and the San Antonio River Authority (SARA) are presenting an exhibit titled If the River Could Talk: 12,000 Years of Life on the San Antonio River, June 12-August 31, 2012.

This exhibition focuses on excavated archaeological finds from the San Antonio River never before seen by the public, and explores the natural and cultural resources that sustained communities overtime. SARA is celebrating 75 years of overseeing the water resources of the San Antonio River coursing through Bexar County and the surrounding areas.

San Antonio River Authority Watershed Plan

San Antonio River between Kenedy and Runge

Have you ever heard of Kenedy, Texas? What about Falls City, Helena, Runge, or Goliad? Surely you know of the San Antonio Riverwalk? The San Antonio River doesn’t suddenly halt once it passes the Alamo. The river flows south to San Antonio Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. The spaces in between San Antonio and the Gulf, however, are relatively unknown even among Texans.